Filled Under: Climate Change

Has Earth’s Missing Heat Been Found?

 

Has Earth’s Missing Heat Been Found?

 

Climate Records Shattered in 2013

Climate Records Shattered in 2013

NOAA quietly revises website after getting caught in global warming lie, admitting 1936 was hotter than 2012

NOAA quietly revises website after getting caught in global warming lie, admitting 1936 was hotter than 2012

NOAA

(NaturalNews) As global warming and climate change alarmists burn tons of fossil fuel jetting around the world, lecturing people about how burning tons of fossil fuel is destroying our planet, federal government agencies and learned academic institutions are quietly revising previously published data to reflect “an inconvenient truth” — that, contrary to their earlier claims, the earth is actually getting cooler, and weather is actually getting milder.One of the most recent examples of this fraud was reported by The Daily Caller: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has been criticized for manipulating temperature records to give the illusion of a warming trend. Since then, the agency has been caught changing temperature data from both the past and present.

Here’s the story. A couple of years ago, NASA scientists and climatologists declared July 2012 to be the hottest month in a report titled, “Too Hot to Handle?” [See it here: http://science.nasa.gov]. During the summer months of that year, the country experienced widespread drought and wildfires burned more than 1.3 million acres of land, according to NASA statistics and data.

Now, according to NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center in 2012, the “average temperature for the contiguous U.S. during July was 77.6°F, 3.3°F above the 20th century average, marking the warmest July and all-time warmest month on
record for the nation in a period of record that dates back to 1895.” [You can see that assessment here: http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov]

‘You can’t get any clearer proof’ of fraud

“The previous warmest July for the nation was July 1936, when the average U.S. temperature was 77.4°F,” NOAA said in 2012.

When checked by The Daily Caller, that claim by the NOAA was still available on the agency’s website. However:

[W]hen meteorologist and climate blogger Anthony Watts went to check the NOAA data [June 29] he found that the science agency had quietly reinstated July 1936 as the hottest month on record in the U.S.

Watts wrote: “Two years ago during the scorching summer of 2012, July 1936 lost its place on the leaderboard and July 2012 became the hottest month on record in the United States. Now, as if by magic, and according to NOAA’s own data, July 1936 is now the hottest month on record again. The past, present, and future all seems to be ‘adjustable’ in NOAA’s world.” [See his blog post here: http://wattsupwiththat.com]

Watts had used data from NOAA’s “Climate at a Glance” plots from 2012, a graphic showing that July 2012 was the hottest month on record at 77.6°F. July 1936 — which was during the infamous Dust Bowl years — is listed at only 77.4°F.

He ran the same data plot again on June 29 and discovered that NOAA inserted a new number in for July 1936; the average temperature for July 1936 was made slightly higher than July 2012, meaning, again, that July 1936 is the hottest year on record.

“You can’t get any clearer proof of NOAA adjusting past temperatures,” Watts wrote. “This isn’t just some issue with gridding, or anomalies, or method, it is about NOAA not being able to present historical climate information of the United States accurately.”

He went on to note that in “one report they give one number, and in another they give a different one with no explanation to the public as to why.

“This is not acceptable. It is not being honest with the public. It is not scientific. It violates the Data Quality Act.”

U.S. ‘cooling since the Thirties’

Watts’ assessment of the NOAA data manipulation came on the heels of earlier reports stating that the federal agency was lowering past temps to create the illusion of a warming trend in the U.S. that did not coincide with the raw data.

The after-the-fact data manipulation was documented by climate blogger Steven Goddard, which was summarily reported by Britain’s Telegraph newspaper earlier in June.

“Goddard shows how, in recent years, NOAA’s US Historical Climatology Network (USHCN) has been ‘adjusting’ its record by replacing real temperatures with data ‘fabricated’ by computer models,” the paper’s Christopher Booker wrote. “The effect of this has been to downgrade earlier temperatures and to exaggerate those from recent decades, to give the impression that the Earth has been warming up much more than is justified by the actual data.”

The real data, Booker said, “show that the US has actually been cooling since the Thirties, the hottest decade on record.”

Sources:

http://dailycaller.com

http://science.nasa.gov

http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov

http://www.telegraph.co.uk

http://science.naturalnews.com

Antarctic Sea Ice Growing Despite Global Warming Warnings

Antarctic Sea Ice Growing Despite Global Warming Warnings

Sunday, 29 Jun 2014 10:37 AM

By Sandy Fitzgerald

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Urgent: Should Obamacare Be Repealed? Vote Here Now!

NASA launches challenges using OpenNEX data

Pulse
By GCN Staff

NASA launches challenges using OpenNEX data

NASA is launching two challenges to give the public an opportunity to create innovative ways to use data from the agency’s Earth science satellites.

The open data challenges will use the Open NASA Earth Exchange (OpenNEX), an Amazon Web Services data and supercomputing platform where users can share knowledge and expertise.

A component of the NASA Earth Exchange, OpenNEX also features a large collection of climate and Earth science satellite data sets, including global land surface images, vegetation conditions, climate observations and climate projections.

“OpenNEX provides the general public with easy access to an integrated Earth science computational and data platform,” said Rama Nemani, principal scientist for the NEX project at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif.

“These challenges allow citizen scientists to realize the value of NASA data assets and offers NASA new ideas on how to share and use that data.”

To educate citizen scientists on how the data on OpenNEX can be used, NASA is releasing a series of online video lectures and hands-on lab modules.

The first stage of the challenge offers as much as $10,000 in awards for ideas on novel uses of the data sets. The second stage, beginning in August, will offer between $30,000 and $50,000 for the development of an application or algorithm that promotes climate resilience using the OpenNEX data, and based on ideas from the first stage of the challenge. NASA will announce the overall challenge winners in December.

OpenNEX is hosted on the Amazon Web Services cloud and available to the public through a Space Act Agreement.

Posted by GCN Staff on Jun 25, 2014 at 12:18 PM

http://gcn.com/blogs/pulse/2014/06/nasa-opennex-challenge.aspx

 

https://nex.nasa.gov/nex/static/htdocs/site/extra/opennex/
main site ….